1.00 The simplest thing
a body can say
of itself
that is if it
speaks, is either
"I am it"
or "I am not it"
and "I have it" or
"I don't have it"

1.01 These most primitive
statements about the self
when combined within
any speaking subject
generate 4 fundamental
states of mind

1.02 These 4 modes
of thought can be
designated as
follows
:

1 The atmoi mode
The subject considers
themselves
"to be it but
not to have it
"

2 The jivat mode
The subject considers
themselves
"not to be it but

but to have it
"

3 The jivatmoi mode
The subject considers
themselves
"to to be it

"
and have it"

4 The anatmoi mode
The subject considers
themselves
"not to be it and

not to have it"

2.00 All known speaking
subjects are sexually
embodied with an inbuilt
biological imperative
to be Looked at
at times

2.01 An 8-fold typology
of the mind of all speaking
subjects is generated when
the presence or absence
of this in-built desire
to be looked at is
combined with the
above 4 modes

3.00 For all individual
speaking subjects their
character mU-biogram
can be defined as that
which represents one
of these eight
fundamental
modes

3.01 From a psychological
point of view there are two
types of
mU-biogram
the extrovert that wants
to
draw you towards them
and the introvert that
wants to
blow you away

3.02 These 8 mU-biograms
represent the following
modes of existence

(0) The b-anatmoi mode
Don't look at me
I am not it and
I don't have it

(1) The d-anatmoi mode
Look at me
I am not it and
I don't have it

(2) The b-atmoi mode
Don't look at me
I am it but
I don't have it

(3) The d-atmoi mode
Look at me
I am it but
I don't have it

(4) The b- jivat mode
Don't look at me
I am not it but
I have it

(5) The d-jivat mode
Look at me
I am not it but
I have it

(6) The b-jivatmoi mode
Don't look at me
I am it and
I have it

(7) The d-jivatmoi mode
Look at me
I am it and
I have it

4.00 All eight modes will be
found both within and without
the
psychoanalytical encounter

4.01 Within any encounter these
modes will be exhibited through
the response of an individual

speaking
subject to the
following two
questions:

1 What sort of "me" are you?

A
"Look at me"
or
"Don't look at me"

2 What sort of "I" are you?

"I am it"or "I am not it"

"I have
it" or "I don't have it"

4.02 In answering the first
the
subject
has the option
of either assuming the
" d" or " b" position

4.03 In answering the second
the
subject has the option
of either going for
being
or not being it before having
or not having it or vice versa

depending upon the initial
response a re-iteration of
half of the second will
therefore be necessary to
establish which of the four
fundamental
modes
is present

3 What about?
"I am it" or "I am not it"
or
What about?
"I have it" or "I don't have it"

4.04 In the re-iteration the order
of
answering generates
a further four modes

4.05 These additional modes
can be designated as follows

1 The atmoi' mode
The subject considers themselves
" not to have it but to be it "

2 The jivat' mode
The
subject considers themselves
"to have it but not to be it"

3 The jivatmoi' mode
The subject considers themselves
"to have it and to be it"

4 The anatmoi' mode
The subject considers themselves
"not to have it and not to be it"

4.06 Thus the original 8-fold typology
will convert
empirically into a 16-fold
one. All sixteen modes will be
found both within and without
the
psychoanalytical
encounter

4.07 Not only will this 16-fold
typology be found naturally
within the speaking speech
of all analytical encounters
but it will also be inscribed
within the
spoken speech
of all natural languages
A linguistic analysis of all
those terms that differentiate
individual differences amongst
speaking subjects will necessarily
reveal
sixten basic domains of
differences within all
natural languages

5.00 At last the whole Freudian
project can now be brought
to a satisfactory scientific
closure assuming that any
individual's spoken
mU-biogram
represents their ultimate limit
of development in infancy
and that their present-day
circumstances although
mirroring these
infantile
experiences have had no
determining influence on
the actual
biogram uttered

5.01 Consequently within the
psychoanalytical encounter it is
not only imperative to establish
what the subject of the speaking
speech is but also what type of
subject is doing the speaking

5.02 Ultimately it is the reigning
character
mU-biogram of the
individual
speaking subject
that constitutes their
fundamental
mode
of existence

5.03 For all speaking subjects
their fundamental mode
of existence is reflected in
the contents of their
actions
(spoken or otherwise) in their
dreams and even in the choice
of cultural
products with which
they surround themselves

5.04 Indeed the differing surface
manifestations of the ways of life
of all individual
speaking subjects
can be seen to be ultimately
determined by the dominant
mU-biogram of each
individual
subject

6.00 In consequence the differing
surface manifestations of all
cultures and societies must be
seen to be ultimately
expressions
of the various character types that
triumph within their respective
social and political arenas

6.01 Within any speaking community
there will be a scatter of these
individual character types that
will be unique to that community

7.00 As far as the individual
speaking subject is concerned
it can be assumed that they
are capable of adopting any
one of these individual
modes

7.01 A series of psychoanalytical
encounters eventually reveals
how all of these modes are
necessarily related within
any one individual
speaking subject

7.011 In the context of the
psychoanalytical
encounter
this
sixteen-fold typology of
speaking
subjects converts
to a matching sixteen-fold
topography of the individual
mind reflecting the interminable
vicissitudes of these biogramatic
modes within an individual life

7.012 From a theoretical point
of view this implies that within
the
mind of each speaking subject
there exists a corresponding
topographic position for each
of the
sixteen mU-biograms

7.013 It ought never to be
forgotten though that the simplest
thing a
body can say of any Other
that is if it speaks is either

 
"Look at you" or
"Don't look at you"

"You are it"or
"You are not it" and
"You have it" or
"You don't have it"

7.014 From the point of view
of Theory this implies that within
the
mind of each speaking subject
there must also exist a corresponding
topographic position for each of
the possible
sixteen U-biograms

7.015 From the point of view of Logic
all such biogramatic positions
whether they be
"m(E)" or "U"
orientated mirror each Other
perfectly in inverted forms

7.02
Indeed it is this set of mirroring
biogramatic modes that constitutes
that order the
Phallocentric Order that
remains central to the structuring of the
minds of all known
Speaking Beings